Dr. Lisa VanWagner is an Assistant Professor of Hepatology and Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, IL.  Dr. VanWagner received her medical degree from the University of Virginia School of Medicine in 2007.  She completed her internship and residency in Internal Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, IL in 2010 and then served as Chief Medical Resident from 2010-2011.  She also obtained her master’s degree in Clinical Investigation from the Northwestern University Graduate School in 2011.  Dr. VanWagner completed her Gastroenterology & Hepatology training at Northwestern in 2014 followed by a Transplant Hepatology Fellowship in 2015 before joining the Northwestern faculty as an Assistant Professor of Medicine-GI & Hepatology and Preventive Medicine.

 

Dr. VanWagner utilizes human population-based approaches, large electronic health record data analysis and health services research methods to define and characterize cardiovascular disease risk prediction, prevention and treatment approaches in patients with chronic liver disease. As a practicing transplant hepatologist, she sees patients with cardiovascular disease after liver transplant and recognizes gaps in our knowledge of the epidemiology and pathobiology of cardiovascular disease in this growing population.  Her scientific work has been recognized by leading professional organizations, with research awards from American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, European Association for the Study of the Liver, American Society of Transplantation (AST) and American Heart Association (AHA).  She has published over 60 peer-reviewed manuscripts. Her publications have been the first to describe findings such as the increased risk of adverse cardiovascular disease events after liver transplant for NASH, the first to describe national estimates of cardiovascular disease events after liver transplant, and the first to develop a clinical liver transplant-specific cardiovascular disease risk assessment tool for clinical use (calculator available at: www.carolt.us). Other publications have been used to develop strategies for policymakers, such as the American Heart Association (annual statistics update), and for clinical practice guidance (AST guidance on cardiovascular disease evaluation and management in liver transplant candidates).